Oklahoma Pioneer Mittie Stephens Cobb enjoyed family, home and garden. Mittie's 1941 Journal shares weathered pioneer experiences and every day life in Arapaho, Oklahoma. Mittie and Rufus "Dad" lived west of Arapaho with daughter Mary and son Frank and owned the Cobb Store in Arapaho. Cecil and Lena Cobb, Fannie and Richard Bland lived nearby. George, Jack, Loys Cooper, Randall and Mildred Shankland moved out of state and stayed in touch by letters. Mittie turned 73 years in 1941 outliving three of her children, Rexie, Rollie and Harvey.

It was serendipity

to have Mittie's Journal to read and share in 2008. The calendar days of 1941 are the same as 2008. Richard received the Journal from his mother, Fannie, and gave the Journal to his cousin Betty in spring 2008. This great-granddaughter first had it in hand in July 2008. For a few weeks it was transcribed to email for family. Mittie's Journal blog began October 12, the anniversary of the day Mittie and Rufus landed at Gip, Oklahoma 1892 in open prairie. Check out that Journal entry. It is a blessing to share this Journal with others. To stay in the matching year the remaining Journal days appear in the Journal Archive as they are posted. Thanks for stopping by.

May 18, 1941, Sunday

A Beautiful Sabbath morning, the first one for six weeks that was not rainy and muddy. President Roosevelt proclaimed this 3rd Sunday in May as "I am an American Day" on 27th day of March in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-fifth.


Dad and Mary are going to Services. I have a stomach-ache that prevents me from going. Scripture, John 21:15-24.

Gladys Blarney came for Mary, so Mary won't go to Services. The day remained bright and pleasant until about night when there was a shower of rain. Received a letter from Loys telling of the time that is spent getting ready for Graduation Exercises. I stumbled and fell on rain slick Porch hurting my knees.

1 comment:

Mittie's Journal said...

"I Am An American Day"


http://www.federalobserver.com/speeches.php?speech=7375
NEW YORK, N. Y. May 18, 1941 - Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior and stormy petrel of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration, today gave a comprehensive definition to the word “American” as he spoke before 100,000 persons gathered on the Mall in Central Park to observe “I am an American” Day.

Noted for his forthright speech, and abhorrence for the circuitous phraseology which he terms “gobbledgook,” Secretary Ickes always is forceful. His words today took on added significance because of the fact that they must be read in the context of these days in mid-1941 when country-wide debate is raging over the actual status of the United States in open support of the Allies."I want to ask a few simple questions. And then I shall answer them.

What has happened to our vaunted idealism? Why have some of us been behaving like scared chickens? Where id the million-throated democratic voice of America?

For years it has been dinned into us that we are a weak nation; that we are an inefficient people; that we are simple-minded. For years we have been told that we are beaten, decayed, and that no part of the world belongs to us any more.

Some amongst us have fallen for this carefully pickled tripe. Some amongst us have fallen for this calculated poison. Some amongst us have begun to preach that the “wave of the future” has passed over us and left us a wet, dead fish.

What constitutes an American? Not color nor race nor religion. Not the pedigree of his family nor the place of his birth. Not the coincidence of his citizenship. Not his social status nor his bank account. Not his trade nor his profession. An American is one who loves justice and believes in the dignity of man. An American is one who will fight for his freedom and that of his neighbor. An American is one who will fight for his freedom and that of his neighbor.

An American is one who will sacrifice prosperity, ease and security in order that he and his children may retain the rights of free men. An American is one in whose heart is engraved the immortal second sentence of the Declaration of Independence.

Americans have always known how to fight for their rights and their way of life. Americans are not afraid to fight. They fight joyously in a just cause.
We Americans know that freedom, like peace, is indivisible. We cannot retain our liberty if three-fourths of the world is enslaved. Brutality, injustice and slavery, if practiced as dictators would have them, universally and systematically, in the long run would destroy us as surely as a fire raging in our nearby neighbor’s house would burn ours if we didn’t help to put out his.

If we are to retain our freedom, we must do everything within our power to aid Britain. We must also do everything to restore to the conquered peoples their freedom. This means the Germans too.

Such a program, if you stop to think, is selfishness on our part. It is the sort of enlightened selfishness that makes the wheels of history go around. It is the sort of enlightened selfishness that wins victories."

January 1941

January 1941
Mittie used "scrapbooking" on daily journal entry.

February 1941

March 1941

April 1941

May 1941

June 1941

July 1941

August 1941

September 1941

October 1941

November 1941

December 1941

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